Valentines Day

Valentines Hotties Of The Week Special

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I know, I am a day late with this post, but for all of those who have been waiting with baited breathe, here is my valentines ‘Hotties’ special. So grab a cuppa,  try not to spill it when you swoon…..Here they are, enjoy!

Happy Valentine’s Day!!

Sean Bean
Richard Armitage
Johnny Depp

 

Toby Stephans
Santiago Cabrera
Aidan Turner
Henry Cavill
Tom Hardy
Matthew Goode

There you go my lovelies, I hope you all had a wonderful valentines days, and as always I would love to know your Valentine’s Hottie, you’re more than welcome to share pictures or gifs with me of your ‘Valentine’ over on Twitter or Facebook.

Valentines Special; Best Romantic Couples From Book And Film.

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Hello my lovelies and a belated Happy Valentines Day, Yes I know I am a day late – as per usual. But one thing led to another and before I knew it my well laid out plan to do a full day of Valentines Theme post’s ended up being just the one – which took me so long to write.

Note to self; when writing a post where I need to do a wee bit of research, do it the day before!

I did promise a whole bunch of Romantic/Valentine posts and I am not one to go back on my word, so here is the second Valentines post. I am going to be sharing my favourite romantic couples from both books and film/tv, to start off lets have a look at a few of my favouite romantic couples from books.

Heathcliffe & Cathy 

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Jack & Robert

The Captain and The Cavalry Trooper (Captivating Captains #1) by Catherine Curzon & Eleanor Harkstead

Jean & Joanna 

Echo In The Wind (Donet Trilogy #2) by Regan Walker

Jamie & Cassie

A Warriner To Rescue her (Wild Warriners #2) by Virginia Heath

Drake & Emily

My Ruthless Prince (The Inferno Club #4) by Gaelen Foley

Aelfhild & Guy

Beguiled By The Forbidden Knight by Elisabeth Hobbes

Helen & Rhys

Marrying Winterbourne (The Ravenels #2 ) by Lisa Kleypas

Silence & Mickey

Scandalous Desires (Maiden Lane #3) by Elizabeth Hoyt

Aren’t they brilliant? Even though, there are hundreds more that I could have added, these are a few of my all out favourite romances. And here is a collection of my favourite romances from TV and Film.

Jack & Melanie

One Fine Day

Anna & Declan

Leap Year

John & Margaret 

North and South

Claire & Jamie

Outlander

Evie & Rick

The Mummy

Helena & Alejandro

Mask of Zorro

Cecelia & Robbie

Atonement

As with the book’s, there are so many couples that I adore from TV and Films, but I just don’t have the time or room on the post. I would love to hear about your favourite romance, is it from a book or from TV?

A Valentine’s Day History #ValentinesDay #History

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Hello my lovelies and Happy Valentines Day!!

So Valentines Day, personally it’s all well and good and lovely to have a day to which to tell a loved one you …well, love them. But it really is far too comercilised for my liking these days, it’s all about pushing sales and dragging people through the door – I do speak from experience, after spending many years doing just that in retail I know how shops think. And anyway, we really shouldn’t need a day to tell someone you love them, right? It should really be a none pressure, every day thing. But even I am willing to put my own personal thoughts of the day behind me to celebrate in my own unique fashion, Which is why I have a whole day of Romantic/Valentines posts coming up for you all.

Over the course of the next few posts, I will be looking into the history of Valentines day, chatting about my favourite romances and sharing all things romance and valentines – which I am pleased to say will involve my very popular ‘Hotties’ 😉 I hope you will stick around.

So to start things off lets a look at the history – you know me, I like history!

Valentine’s day as it is now is far removed from how it was once seen thousands of years ago, and to be honest once you start researching this oh-so romantic day you will soon clearly see that it’s origins is anything but romantic or full of love, but it is quite dark and a wee bit gory. Yes, it was that part that got me hooked as well 😉 and what a fascinating multi layered story it is. I don’t know if people know, but I did a previous post about Valentine’s day many years ago when Chicks, Rogues and Scandals was just starting up. At looking back at that post, as fascinating as it is – who knew that I could write a fascinating post, complete news to me that one. But I did hold back somewhat on the history, which is why with this post I intend to bombard you with as much of the history of Valentines as I possibly can – you will most likely fall asleep.

Oh, by the way if your interested in my previous Valentines Post, here is a link A Little History – Valentine’s Special.

So Valentine’s day as we know it today is all about flowers and chocolates and maybe the odd marriage proposal, but what we don’t do is actually celebrate the reason why the whole day exists and that is to honour Saint Valentine. Now here it the start of where thing become a little dark and confusing as there is three Christian saints that have been recognised by the church as being Valentine and more than that Valentine in one form or another has got roots in both Roman and Christian tradition and legend – this is where the none historians of the world (such as myself) get a wee bit perplexed as to who is who, but its fun to try and figure it out.

The Tale of Valentine.

The catholic church does recognise three different saints named Valentine (or Velentinus) all three of whom were martyred, hence being a saint I suppose. There is one legend that says Valentine was a priest who served during the 3rd century in Rome and by the sounds of him he was quite a rule breaker. The Emperor Claudius II thought that single men made better soldiers then those with wives and families– which I’m sure we all know that is a load of codswallop, right? So old Claudius outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine thought this, as I do was a – shall I say it again? Ok, I will – a load of Codswallop he knew that this wasn’t right, he saw the injustice so he went behind the Emperors back – he literally threw the decree back into Claudius’ face as he continued to perform marriages to all the young lovers in secret. As honourable and decent as his actions were, they led him with a death sentence once Claudius found out what Valentine was doing.

There or other stories about how he died, another source claims he was helping Christians escape harsh Roman prison’s and that was the reason he was put to death. But really, how can anyone know for certain? According to legend Valentine himself sent the very first ‘valentines’ card, it is legend that he fell in love with his jailor’s daughter after she began to visit him in prison. It is alleged that he sent her a letter and he signed it “From your Valentine” which we all know is how the majority of Valentine’s messages are signed today.

So here is where history, legend and myths becomes entwined; some believe that Valentines day is celebrated to commemorate Saint Valentines death and burial which some believe occurred in AD. 270. While others think that Valentines day is all down to the Christian Church who it is said moved their St Valentines Feast day to the middle of February so that they could ‘Christianize’ the pagan celebration of Lupercalia.

Dedication To The Goddess.

The fertility festival of Lupercalia was a dedication to the goddess Faunus, this usually occurred from the 13th to 15th of February. This wasn’t so much as a celebration of even a festival, what went on during Lupercalia was more a ceremony which heavily featured animal sacrifice and an awful lot of nudity. In one source it says that they were shepherds and in others it says a secret order of Roman priests; The Luperci – anyway whoever they were, they would gather where the infants Romulus and Remus were believed to have been cared for by the she-wolf otherwise known as Lupa. Once in the sacred cave copious amounts of wine would be drunk followed by various animals being sacrificed; a goat for fertility and a dog for purification both animals would be males as these had strong sexual instincts. After the men would then strip, don the animal hides and run through the fields, village street wherever they lived basically and slap the women they wanted with the blooded hides, the women would be very swiftly married off by the priest who was watching over the ceremony and…..well, I think you can gather what comes next. I, for one am very pleased that this doesn’t happen today, but then again would we ladies really allow this to happen? I doubt it!

Towards the end of the fifth century, Pope Gelasius I ended up banning the Lupercalia festival which had already started to fall out of favour with some in the upper echelons of society. He established Saint Valentines day on the 14th February what he thought of as a more Christian holiday instead of a pagan/heathen ritual. This whole new holiday didn’t really establish itself until the 14th century which then saw Valentine’s greetings become more popular. The oldest known valentine still in existence today which is a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt.

Je suis desja d’amour tanné
Ma tres doulce Valentinée…”

Charles, Duck of Orleans 1415

The Chaucer Effect.

During my research for this post I have found numerous sites that state that Valentines Day wouldn’t be the day of romance as we know it today if it wasn’t for Geoffrey Chaucer. It is said that the author of the Canterbury tales brought the concept of love being connected to Valentines Day and then there are some who believe that Chaucer was the all out inventor of the day. Whether or not that part of the tale is true, no one will ever know, it depends of what you want to believe but one thing is for certain that Chaucer’s poem ‘Parliament of the Foules’ is thought to be the very first written poem which ties both love and romance with Valentines Day, it was the following verse which leads historians to believe Chaucer was the creator of Valentines Day.

For this was Saint Valentine’s day, when every bird of every kind that men can imagine comes to this place to choose his mate...”

Cards and Love Notes.

Even though the above notes and poem were popular and did start of the sharing of little love notes, exchanging Valentines Days cards or Love notes didn’t actually become popular in Britain until the 18th century The first Valentine cards were initially hand made – but then again why are we surprised, they didn’t have mass manufacturing and machines spitting a hundred out a minute in those days. Everything was more well thought out, lovers would decorate paper with romantic symbols which would have included flowers and love knots. They often would have included a puzzle or a few lines of poetry along with their card. Isn’t that sweet? I love how much thought they put into them, how they thought of the recipient. Once finished the cards would then be secretly slipped under you ‘valentines’ door, or even tied to the door-knocker with ribbon. It was during the Georgian era when pre-printed cards started to appear, at the time they weren’t as popular as the more lovingly hand-made ones but that was all about to change and soon pre-printed cards as we know are all the rage. Not just cheap but convenient for today’s all go society!

The oldest surviving examples of one of these cards dates back to 1797, it is currently held by the York Castle Museum and was sent by Catherine Mossday to a Mr Brown or London, it is decorated with little flowers and the images of cupid and a verse around the border which reads :

Since on this ever Happy day,


All Nature’s full of Love and Play


Yet harmless still if my design,


‘Tis but to be your Valentine

As we all know once the Victorian age arrived there was so much change, there was rapid advances in manufacturing and technologies that it became easier then ever before to mass produce Valentine’s cards, which soon became very popular. It is thought that by the 1820’s at least 200,000 Valentine’s cards had been circulated around London alone. Once the Uniform Penny Post was introduced in 1840 the amount of cards being sent and received just doubled. Victorian cards tended to far more elaborate, with fancy paper, lace work, embossing and various other intricate designs and as today the elaborate the design the more expensive the card and obviously there were some – just like today- that would have measured just how much their special someone loved them by how they would have spent on the card. Which I have always thought that to be a little uncomfortable thinking, what does it matter how much a card costs? It’s the thought that counts, right? One that didn’t feature on the Victorian cards was the huge red heart that is so synonymous to how we see love and valentines today. But, whatever they had on them, or however elaborate they were they came from the heart of someone who loves another very dearly.

But, that was not always the case when it came to the Victorians!

They created the not so romantic ‘Vinegar Valentines’ which it’s name literally speaks for itself, these weren’t lovey-dovey they were basically insult cards. They usually mocked the man’s profession of the woman’s appearance in some way, it is said that some of these cards were incredibly horrible – a bit like a poisonous pen letter. One of the few surviving ‘Vinegar Valentines’ which lives in the University of Birmingham features a lady with a large nose on the front with the tag line which said ‘Miss Nosey’ with the following rhyme:

On account of your talk of others’ affairs

At most dances you sit warming the chairs.

Because of the care with which you attend

To all others’ business you haven’t a friend.

By the mid-19th century the concept of sending your loved ones Valentines cards literally blew up and started to take on the form which we are more accustomed to, especially once it across the Atlantic to America. Cards rapidly gained popularity there, where they were initially advertised as a British fashion, advanced American technologies meant that more elaborate cards were produced cheaply. In 1913 Hallmark Cards produced their first Valentine’s card, representing a key development in the commercialisation of Valentine’s Day and the beginning of what we know see as Valentines day.

And thus, we have gone full circle, I don’t know about you but today’s overly commercialised and cheaper valentine’s just don’t have the same appeal as the lovingly hand-made Georgian ones do.

Before, I go because this post has run on far longer then I expected – Did You Know?
Approximately 150 million Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged annually, making Valentine’s Day the second most popular card-sending holiday after Christmas.

Hottie’s Of The Week ~ Valentines Special

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Just a Selection of super Hot men especially for Valentine’s, so if you haven’t got a special one or a Valentine then your sure to find one here and if the Valentine you have got isn’t really up to scratch (Haha) then have a look at these beauties. . .We can but dream can’t we?

Enjoy!!

tumblr_static_tumblr_static_5fix2mt7sqw440kkk8gw8s4cc_640
Tom Hardy
Hugh Jackman
Raoul Bova
James Purefoy
Michael Fassbender
Rupert Penry-Jones
The Butler
Gerard Butler

I’d love to know who your dream Valentine is, let me know!

Love Letter from WW1

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I came across this a while ago and I was just waiting for the right time to post it, it is so lovely that I just wanted to share it with you all.


This is a love letter from a French woman to a British soldier during the First World War it was unearthed in 2014. The letter, sent on Valentine’s Day in 1916, was sent as preparations were under way for the Battle of the Somme. In a mixture of English and French, Eleornore Anneelle, a cafe owner’s daughter from the Somme village of Berteaucourt-les-Dames, declared her love for Private James Ivan “Jimmy” Menzies, a member of the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment who had either been billeted at the cafe or was a regular visitor there.


The letter was bequeathed to the University of Leeds’ Liddle Collection of private papers of those who lived through the First World War, by Mr Menzies’ daughter.Jimmy Menzies, who had signed up at the age of 18 not long after war broke out, was badly wounded in the Battle of the Somme in August 1916.He performed in concert parties during the remainder of the war and was discharged before the armistice was signed, the university said, then went on to become a singer and actor, famous for his comic baritone roles with the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company in the 1920s. In 1923 he married fellow D’Oyly Carte singer Elsie Griffin, who had entertained British troops in France during the war, popularizing songs such as Danny Boy and Roses of Picardy in the trenches.


Here is the full letter, translated:


Dear friend
I’m answering your letter that I received this morning, it gave me great pleasure to hear that you’re well; I am also well, as are all the family. I think of you always, and send you my very best wishes. If you are in Candas as you said I hope you will come and see us, as it’s not very far from us. Next time you can send me more details. My parents send their best wishes and say hello.
With best wishes from a girlfriend who thinks of you always.
My love you
When shall I see you again
Kisse xxxxxxxxxxx
Hoping to get some good news from you soon.
Eleonore Aneelle, Cafe de la Poste, Berteaucourt-les-dames, Somme.

A Little History Part Four; Valentines Special

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So start my “A little History Series” I thought we might look into Valentines Day I have dug up a bit of trivia about this oh-so Loved Up day.
Every February 14, across many part’s of the world, card’s and gift’s are exchanged between loved ones, all in the name of St. Valentine. But who is this mysterious Valentine? and where did these traditions come from?

THE LEGEND OF ST. VALENTINE

The history of Valentine’s Day and the story of its patron saint is surround by mystery and intrigue. So February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and love but it’s not all about the gift’s, flowers and card’s it’s original state of St Valentines Day was full of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition.
But who was Saint Valentine? and more importantly how did he become associated with this ancient rite?

Saint Valentine

The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend say’s that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. The then Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Well obviously Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death.

 
There are many other stories about how Valentine died but there are just too many to mention for my little segment so there is a link at the bottom of the page that may be interesting for those who wish to learn more.

ORIGINS OF VALENTINE’S DAY: A PAGAN FESTIVAL IN FEBRUARY

There is two version’s of what some people believe valentine’s day is all about about, some believe that Valentine’s Day is celebrated commemorate the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial–which probably occurred around A.D. 270. And other’s believe that Valentine’s Day was created by the Christian church who may have decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia.

 
Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman goddess of agriculture which was celebrated at Ides which is thought to be February 15.

 
The Festival of Lupercalia : The Luperci (an order of Roman priests) would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus were believed to have been cared for by a she-wolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat’s hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city’s bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. These matches often ended in marriage.

VALENTINE’S DAY: A DAY OF ROMANCE

Lupercalia survived the initial rise of Christianity and but was outlawed at the end of the 5th century, when Pope Gelasius declared February 14 St. Valentine’s Day. It was not until much later, however, that the day became definitively associated with love.
Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine’s didn’t begin to appear until after 1400. The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt.

 
“Je suis desja d’amour tanné
Ma tres doulce Valentinée…” Charles, Duck of Orleans 1415

 
Did You Know?
Approximately 150 million Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged annually, making Valentine’s Day the second most popular card-sending holiday after Christmas.

 
A History Of Valentines Day
Saints, Beheading’s and Chaucer; A Valentines History

Valentines Poetry

 


The earliest surviving valentines in English appears to be those in the Paston Letters, written in 1477 by Margery Brewes to her future husband John Paston.

 
“my right well-beloved Valentine” Margery Brewes 1477

 
Valentine’s Day is mentioned ruefully by Ophelia in Hamlet (1600–1601) Below :

 
To-morrow is Saint Valentine’s day,
All in the morning betime,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.
Then up he rose, and donn’d his clothes,
And dupp’d the chamber-door;
Let in the maid, that out a maid
Never departed more.”
William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5
“All the Ayre is thy Diocese
And all the chirping Queristers
And other birds ar thy parishioners
Thou marryest every yeare
The Lyrick Lark, and the graue whispering Doue,
The Sparrow that neglects his life for loue,
The houshold bird with the redd stomacher
Thou makst the Blackbird speede as soone,
As doth the Goldfinch, or the Halcyon
The Husband Cock lookes out and soone is spedd
And meets his wife, which brings her feather-bed.
This day more cheerfully than ever shine
This day which might inflame thy selfe old Valentine.”

The verse Roses are red echoes conventions traceable as far back as Edmund Spenser’s epic The Faerie Queene (1590) Below :

“She bath’d with roses red, and violets blew,
And all the sweetest flowres, that in the forrest grew.”

The modern cliché Valentine’s Day poem can be found in the collection of English nursery rhymes Gammer Gurton’s Garland (1784) below :

“The rose is red, the violet’s blue,
The honey’s sweet, and so are you.
Thou art my love and I am thine;
I drew thee to my Valentine:
The lot was cast and then I drew,
And Fortune said it shou’d be you.” 

Who is your Valentine?

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I am appealing to my lovely reader’s. . .Why? Because it is Valentines Day this weekend I am going to be doing a Valentines special for my Weekend Hottie’s but with a difference, I would like to post not my own favorite Valentine but my reader’s.

There is no theme or anything I just want to know your own favorite or dream Valentine and I will post them in my Valentines special.

Let me know!