WW1

#Review Daughters of War by Lizzie Page (@LizziePagewrite) #WW1 #DaughtersOfWar #Historical #Romance @bookouture

Posted on

An emotional tale of wartime love and sacrifice, inspired by an incredible true story…

As a teenager in Chicago, May always dreamed of travelling the world. So when she meets handsome George Turner, she jumps at the chance to return to London as his wife. Ten years later, May is wondering if she’s made a terrible mistake.

It’s 1914 and war has been declared in Europe. All around, brave young men are being called up to serve. George, banned from conscription himself, has taken to the bottle, and May suspects he’s seeing other women too. She longs for a way to escape.

The chance comes when May meets veteran nurse Elsie, who persuades May to join the war effort. May knows nothing of nursing – it will be difficult, dangerous work, but her heart is telling her it’s the right thing to do.

But then George does the unthinkable and May’s future is put at risk. Will she have to make the impossible choice between duty to her family and her promise to the soldiers on the front line? And can she live with the consequences if her husband goes through with what he’s threatening to do?

My View

This is the second book in the planned trilogy which focus’s on the unbelievably courageous women of the Great War, and I have to say that this is a very worthy follow up to the hugely emotional and incredible The War Nurses and I really cannot wait for the third and final book, which I know will be another emotional ride just as this and the previous book have been.

This is an inspiring, emotional, heartbreaking, mesmerising, charming, haunting book that is inspired by the remarkable life of May Borden who was a nurse, novelist and poet during the Great War. The story opens with May in a bit of a depression, the man she thought she was to lead a whole new life with has is now a drunk and worse than that she knows that her husband is cheating on her. She is tired of her life surrounded by a man who doesn’t love or respect her, she wants to escape. Which is when she meets vivacious Elsie, who talks May into joining the nursing core. May knows nothing about nursing, but she feels that this is the very thing that could turn around her life.

Even though May is a hugely inspiring woman and what she did was amazing, while reading this I was at times in two frames of mind about May. There is no denying what she did was incredible and I am in awe and applaud everyone of those brave women who went to the front, but at times I felt at times she did act like a child herself, she needed stand up for herself more than she did. I felt she was as conflicted as the very war she was working in, I don’t think she was a strong women but she was a real one, she was plunged into a horrific war while her children were still at home. But what really made me soften towards May was her unrelenting compassion, loyalty and her unrelenting need to help those men who were experiencing the very worst that humans can do to on e and other.

I have to say that Lizzie Page is an unbelievably gifted writer, her absolute passion for these incredible women, the history and her thirst to share these wonderful stories with the world is evident in each page she has lovingly written, her love and passion comes through the story.

This is another powerful story that makes you stop and really take in what these women sacrificed for us, as with the war Nurses this isn’t just about bombarding the reading with sights and sounds from the front, this is about women coming together forming unbreakable friendships and doing their best to help. It’s a beautiful book and one that really needs to be read, no matter your views on the war we all need to hear these stories.

Emotional and expertly written!

This was an Arc copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Daughter of War can be purchased from Amazon.

Advertisements

#Review A Daughters Christmas Wish (Cornish Tales #4) by Victoria Cornwall (@VickieCornwall) #WW1Romance #Christmas #ADaughtersChristmasWish #CornishTales @ChocLitUK

Posted on

A Cornish Christmas wish sent across the ocean …

Christmas, Cornwall 1919

A promise to a fellow soldier leads Nicholas to Cornwall for Christmas, and to the teashop managed by Rose; the youngest daughter of a family whose festive spirit has been blighted by their wartime experiences. But as Nicholas strives to give Rose the best Christmas she could wish for, he begins to question whether his efforts are to honour his friend, or whether there is another reason…

My View

This is a beautiful book that captures a moment in history, that really emphasises the emotional suffering that gripped the country. Set after the great war , The Daughters Christmas Wish focusses on the aftermath of that horrendous war. The main character’s Rose and Nicholas have both lost and now trying to move on with their lives, which I think Ms Cornwall has portrayed beautifully, not that I’m surprised as she is a wonderfully skilful writer who can enchant and engage the reader from the very first page.

It’s 1919, the great war is finally over and people are attempting to move on and rebuild their lives after years of heartache and suffering. Nicholas is back home, after the war he couldn’t face returning home without his best friend so he re-enlisted for another year but now he is back to fulfil a promise he made to fellow soldier and fallen friend; Sam. That was to go back to home to Cornwall and give Sam’s fiancée; Rose the best Christmas she could ever wish for. I love the way he comes to make her Christmas special and how she wanted it, he took a poem that she wrote to Sam about Christmas and made every line of that poem reality for her. Which really is the most romantic thing that you have ever read and really shows just what an incredibly kind and honourable and gentle man Nicholas is. He too has been affected by his experiences from the war, those experiences have imprinted on him a sense of needing to over come loss.

Rose doesn’t really feel like celebrating Christmas, she is deeply unhappy, her whole life has completely changed, but not for the good. Rose and her family have all been scarred by the war, her brother Arthur and her fiancée Sam have both been killed on the front which has left her in a deeply unhappy state and that of her parent’s too, who have become grief stricken to the point that they are stuck in the darkness and forget about their daughter. My heart broke for Rose, she is clearly in pain, she is struggling and a bit lost, but she has an inner strength that makes her get up and put one foot in front of the other.

I loved this book, it’s a beautiful and poignant love story that is written with absolute care and sensitivity for the era and subject. The character’s are realistic to the time, they have a heart-breaking tender and sweetness about them that will make you fall in love with them. This is an emotional book that will have you reaching for the tissues and fill your heart with love and joy for the festive season.

I am in absolute love with this book, simply stunning!

This was an ARC via the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

The Daughters Christmas Wish is available from Amazon.

#Review – The Poppy Field: A Gripping and Historical Romance by Deborah Carr (@DebsCarr) #WW1 #Historical #Romance #100Years @HarperImpulse

Posted on

One to Watch’ Good Housekeeping

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War.

Young nurse, Gemma, is struggling with the traumas she has witnessed through her job in the NHS. Needing to escape from it all, Gemma agrees to help renovate a rundown farmhouse in Doullens, France, a town near the Somme. There, in a boarded-up cupboard, wrapped in old newspapers, is a tin that reveals the secret letters and heartache of Alice Le Breton, a young volunteer nurse who worked in a casualty clearing station near the front line.

Set in the present day and during the horrifying years of the war, both woman discover deep down the strength and courage to carry on in even the most difficult of times. Through Alice’s words and her unfailing love for her sweetheart at the front, Gemma learns to truly live again..

My View

I have read many stories set during the WW1 era but I think that this could be one of my favourites, it is simply stunning and one of those rare books that I did genuinely have a weep over. The last couple of pages will break even the most hardened of hearts. This is a powerful, emotional and incredibly poignant and romantic book that will leave the reader with a lump in their throats and feeling completely overawed by the unimaginable heart-break and loss and yet at the same time it is hugely satisfying.

The Poppy Field is split between two era’s and follows two different but incredible woman who are both facing a tough and emotional time. Linked together through nursing, present day Gemma is a NHS trauma nurse, she is feeling the strain and is struggling by what she has experienced in her job. She needs to get away from everything she has seen and try to move on, so she agrees to help er father renovate an old farmhouse in Northern France. She only see’;s this as a break to basically clear her head, she doesn’t intend of staying in France. That is until two thing’s happen.

One, she meets Tom, the supremely handsome contactor who has agreed to her her with the refurbishment; and two she finds an old box in the house that is full of letters from a woman called Alice who was a volunteer nurse during the great war. I think reading about and getting to know Alice through these old letters is so good for Gemma, she isn’t overly confident, she is definitely stuck in her shell and reading about what this amazing woman went through is a soothing balm for her. As Gemma and Tom get on with renovating the house, Tom is very smitten with shy Gemma, he sees something in her that she unfortunately doesn’t see herself; that she is a wonderful woman.

As much as Gemma and Tom’s story is beautifully touching, I was particularly drawn to Alice. It was her story that found impacted on me, Alice left home and her fiancé to volunteer with the nursing corpse which just happened to be next door to the Somme so she saw some real horrors. The letters she had been writing were to two men, Peter and Ed, both we come to learn are such an integral part of her life. Through her own words we get a glimpse of her life, of her experiences and most importantly we get a real sense of the strong, patient, kind and utterly brilliant woman that she was.

This book is incredible, it is a beautifully written, utterly mesmerising and beautiful story that captures the readers attention and takes them on a heart-wrenching journey through both of these amazing women’s lives. This is the first time I have read Deborah Carrs work and I can say for certain it will not be the last, her writing is gift we all need to receive.

A captivating, poignant and beautiful book.

This was a ARC copy via the publisher from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Poppy Field is available now from Amazon and I say that you really must buy this one!

#Review – Heroic Measures by Jo-Ann Powers (@CeriseDeLand) #WW1 #Romance #Historic #HeroicMeasures @WildRosePress

Posted on

Honoring those who have served their country in war, most focus on those who have fought on the battlefields. But one group’s heroics under fire have slipped through the pages of history, a group whose blood and sweat were left in operating rooms and hospital tents, a group whose heroism has seldom been measured.

For nurse Gwen Spencer, fighting battles is nothing new. An orphan sent to live with a vengeful aunt, Gwen picked coal and scrubbed floors to earn a living. But when she decides to become a nurse, she steps outside the boundaries of her aunt’s demands…and into a world of her own making.

Leaving her hometown for France, she helps doctors mend thousands of brutally injured Doughboys under primitive conditions. Amid the chaos, she volunteers to go ever forward to the front lines. Braving bombings and the madness of men crazed by the hell of war, she is stunned to discover one man she can love. A man she can share her life with.

But in the insanity and bloodshed she learns the measures of her own desires. Dare she attempt to become a woman of accomplishment? Or has looking into the face of war and death given her the courage to live her life to the fullest?

My View

I knew when I came to read this book that it would be an emotional ride as I walked in the footsteps of such heroic and supremely inspiring women, but I was over-awed and whilst reading this book. I felt in so much awe of Gwen and her fellow nurses who did the most incredible job, these women were vital for the war effort. Jo-Ann Power has gone above and beyond with telling these extraordinary women’s stories, the depth of research is incredible at times it was like actually being standing right beside them. It painted an emotionally raw and brutally real picture of what these women went through.

I think what really struck me most when reading this book was just how little I knew about front line nurses from America. I think that being from the UK, we take all our meticulous record keeping via the archives and the War Graves Commission for granted and we tend to be a little ignorant to the fact that the Great War affected not just us on Europe and the common wealth but those from America also feature heavily, we just don’t really know about them. Which is why this book is so damn important, It is exactly what we need in this world and it is one of those rare books that will stand the test of time,

The story really follows one young nurse; Gwen – who is a hugely likeable character, a woman after my own heart she has spirit, determination, she has seen her fair share of troubles before she even goes into nursing, but those issues have made her the strong, reliable and passionate woman I found her to be. We first see her in nursing college where her and her close knit group of friends have fun between studies, once graduated they now face the real world. Unfortunately this world is now at war and Gwen soon finds herself facing all the horrors of the front, as she is sent to battled destroyed France.

This is definitely the most heart breaking part of the book what Gwen and her friends face day in day out is harrowing. The picture of that dark and soul destroying place is vivid and real, Ms Power has done an absolutely incredible job at portraying the scene with the utmost realism and respect and this is where the authors research and brilliant writing comes in to it’s own, she captures your attention through out the book and I can guarantee that there is times you will get a lump in your throat ad tears in your eyes.

Heroic Measures is an emotionally powerful read that will leave the reader in absolute stunned silence, it’s true, poignant and highlights an aspect of women’s history that I think a lot of us may have forgotten.

Very highly recommended one of the best books I have read and one that everyone should read.

This was a complimentary copy from the author in exchange for an honest review.

Heroic Measures can be purchased at Amazon.

Review – The Captain and The Cavalry Trooper (Captivating Captains #1) by Catherine Curzon & Eleanor Harkstead

Posted on Updated on

As the Great War tears Europe apart, two men from different worlds find sanctuary in each other’s arms.

Captain Robert Thorne is the fiercest officer in the regiment. Awaiting the command to go to the front, he has no time for simpering, comely lads. That’s until one summer day in 1917, when his dark, flashing eye falls upon the newest recruit at Chateau de Desgravier, a fresh-faced farmer’s boy with little experience of life and a wealth of poetry in his heart.

Trooper Jack Woodvine has a way with strong, difficult stallions, and whispers them to his gentle will. Yet even he has never tamed a creature like Captain Thorne.

With the shadow of the Great War and the scheming of enemies closer to home threatening their fleeting chance at happiness, can the captain and the cavalry trooper make it home safely? More importantly, will they see peacetime together?

This is book one in the new ‘Captivating Captains’ series, and what an introduction! I think this is set to be a powerful and addictive series and a great addition to both Ms Curzon and Ms Hartstead’s catalogue, it is astoundingly touching and beautifully portrayed. There is heartache, tender romance and danger all wrapped up in brilliant story from an era that really doesn’t get show cased enough in Historical Romance – which I don’t know why, as it was such a intriguing era that had so much going on.

On one summer day in 1917 a young trooper arrives at the Chateau de Desgravier, where a segment of the British Army is based. Trooper Jack Woodvine is a raw and inexperienced soldier having enlisted late due to a shoulder injury and so far, he’s seen very little in the war, but what he lacks in experience he makes up for in his skills with horses. He can calm and soothe the most stressed and temperamental animal and in doing so can also soothe the owners. As soon as he gets to the Chateau he soon finds out that this place could just be a dangerous as being at the front.

Budding poet Jack has always thought there was something not quite ‘right’ about him, his desires don’t follow with what is expected, he has always hidden that side of himself and has never acted on his urges. Up until he had joined the army, he was always ashamed and embarrassed about his what he calls ‘unnatural desires’ and then he stepped into the Chateau de Desgravier and meets his commanding officer; the fierce, professional and charismatic Captain Thorne, who captures Jack’s attention and his imagination from the first moment he see’s him. But, surely such a fine figure of a man wouldn’t be interested in a lowly farmer’s son.

Jack is a real cutie! He is just wanting to do his bit for his country, even though he had broken his shoulder – which would have meant that he would have been exempted – he still joined. Jack is such a cute lad, he is naive of the world around him I don’t think that he thoroughly realises what is in store for him and what he would be facing. Yet he yearns to take his place amongst all the others who have taken the King’s shilling, and I respect him for that. He isn’t made for war though, but he does feel very strongly about doing the right thing. I think in a way he wants to prove himself, he wants to show that he isn’t just a farmer’s son.

Captain Thorne – Robert, is by far the most gruff and fiercest of all the officer’s, he is an experienced Captain and has seen way too much fighting. He is based at Chateau de Desgravier but he knows that it is only a matter of time before he and men at the Chateau will be deployed to the front, especially with the way the war is going and the amount of men that the army is losing on a daily basis. He really isn’t interested in anyone and finds that he isn’t in the right frame of mind to have his head turned by handsome young lad’s, that is until he meets his newest recruit.

“It’s Robert.”

Jack sighed, a laugh in his throat.

“See, I can whisper the horses and I can whisper the officers too….but I havn’t a clue what the B. stands for.”

“that’s my one remaining mystery…”

Jack is given the job as Robert’s groom, to care for his temperamental white horse; Apollo. Under Jack’s gentle and unwavering care of Apollo he starts to calm the tormented mind of the horse and in the process he and Robert begin to grow closer until they finally give into their mutual attraction for one and other. But, all does not go plain sailing for our couple, not only are they under constant threat from the war but there is danger’s lurking within the Chateau de Desgravier itself that Jack ad Robert have to overcome.

Robert is a good man he wants to do the best for his boys, if he could he would send each and everyone of them home, so they can’t be hurt by the vicious fighting. He has seen what this brutal and violent war is doing to innocent young men and he has aged ten years since it started. He has been in the trenches and at the front and that has darkened him in ways that may never see light again, it has jaded him. Meeting Jack has really brought some fun and love back into his life and light back into his dark nearly dead eyes. And in return Robert is an attentive, caring and super sensual lover.

They are such a cute couple and there are some really lovely and tender moments between them, I particulay like those quiet moments when they are just being themselves. There is a really lovely scene when they are having a quiet moment together where Jack is quietly writing a poem about Apollo while Robert is secretly drawing him. It’s so beautifully written and shows them for the tender and romantic men they are and gives them the moment of calmness before the storm as there are dangers on the horizon not just with the war but closer to home in the shape of their own comrades.

“I love you, Robert. No matter what happens, I always will.”

“Wherever we may be, I shall never love another but you.” Thornes voice trembled, just enough for Jack to sense the trepidation in him. “And I never have until I saw you.”

Jack pressed his lips to Thornes neck.

“I loved you from the moment you first smiled at me.”

There are some real characters at the Chateau, from the manipulating and bullying Quin ‘Queenie’ to the cheeky and rakish, choir boy Bryn, the mix of different personalities gives the story a sense of real life.

This is wonderful, a haunting tale of love found in the most unexpected and dangerous places between two characters, who are sensitive and courageous. Even though it is set right on the front with the war in the background, at a time where there was so much bloodshed and loss, the story is very much about Robert and Jack. It is very moving and beautifully written – not that I was surprised at that, as these two ladies are wonderful narrators. I do love The Captain and The Trooper, I will admit to being, a little biased as I already have a love for this era, but this really captures the imagination of that period but in a completely new and profound way.

I am looking forward to reading more from The Captivating Captain’s, I think this series is going to be a wonderfully moving and addictive and I can’t wait to see where we go next.

This is so good, I would recommend this to anyone who likes historical romances. Even for those that don’t usually read this genre I would highly recommend it, all I will say is put a side what you think of WW1 era romances and read this with fresh eyes, because it is fabulous and so wonderfully romantic, and I am positive you will fall head over heals for Robert and Jack. 😉

This was a ARC  copy via the authors in exchange for an honest review.

The Captain and the Cavalry Trooper is to be released on 3rd April and can be pre-ordered from Amazon.

A Little History; Heroines In History

Posted on Updated on

It has been a while since I wrote a post for my “A Little History” series and for its return I thought I would share with you some of my heroines in history. Unfortunately I can’t list all of the brilliant women in history that I have looked up to over the years, my post would go on for days if I did. So I have chosen these five women who were so very different and yet so incredible in their own right. These five women were strong and independent and courageous.

Grace Darling

webpage_20170121_151320
Grace Darling

I don’t know if anyone knows about Grace but she was a brave and brilliant young woman in the Victorian era. Grace lived with her father in a lighthouse on the Farne Isles, off the Northumberland coast when in Autumn 1838 she spotted the ship wreck of the SS Forfarshire on the rocks on a nearby Island, while looking out of her bedroom window. She and her father determined that the rough sea was too harsh for the life boat so together her and her father got in their own little row-boat and set off towards the wreck. Grace and her father rescued 13 people and then made their way back to the safety of their lighthouse home.

Grace was after that inundated with gifts and accolades because the bravery she showed on that day, I can’t even think how much courage it must have taken to step into that tiny row-boat and row out on to that turbulent sea.

Grace later became ill and in October 1842 she died at the tender age of 26 from Turberculosis, Grace was an ordinary young woman who selflessly put her own life on the line to rescue other’s and because of her bravery she changed how women were perceived in that era.

Flora Sandes

webpage_20170121_151824
Flora Sandes

Flora Sandes was the only British woman to serve as a soldier on the frontline and in the trenches during WWI, but she didn’t just serve as just a regular soldier she worked her way through the ranks to become a Sergeant Major. The story of how Flora managed to get there is just as incredible, she was a St Johns Ambulance volunteer , she shot a man in self-defense and went to Serbia to serve as a nurse. Once in Serbia she was separated from her colleagues and she did the only thing she could to survive and that was to join the Serbian army as a soldier.

The fact that she was a 40-year-old British women and the daughter of a clergyman didn’t mean a thing, she fought side by side with the men – The Serbian army accepted women at that point – and she fought so well that she was quickly promoted. Flora was injured by a grenade which put an end to her military career but the Serbian Military honoured her with their highest award – the Order of the Karadordes Star for her bravery.

Violette Szarbo

webpage_20170121_152034
Violette Szarbo

Violette was by far one of the bravest women in British history, she was an incredible woman. Violette was half French and half English, in 1940 she married a French officer who died in battle the same year, following his death Violette wanted a bit of excitement and adventure she joined the FRench Section of the Special Operations Executive or SOE and worked as a Secret Agent in occupied France.

It was on one of her missions that she was captured and taken tp Ravensbruck concentration camp, where after months of interrogations and she refused to speak, she and two of her SOE colleagues were executed.

In 1946 Violette Szarbo was the first British woman to be posthumously awarded the George Cross, the medal was pinned to the chest of her daughter Tania who was wearing a dress her mother had bought her on one of her missions to Paris. There is a brilliant film about her called “Carve Her name With Pride” which stars the amazing Virginia Mckenna.

Emily Bronte

webpage_20170121_152354
Emily Bronte

Emily was an absolute hero of mine when I was growing up, Wuthering Heights is just about the best piece of literature there is, I just loved how raw and real it is. How she captured how powerful and moving the moors and it’s inhabitants can be.

From all accounts about Emily she was a shy, home-loving recluse who loved nothing better than wandering around the moors, happy in her own little world and on her own. She is often refered to as intensely creative and passionate, a free spirit and an iconic tortured genius. and going by the brilliance that Wuthering Heights is, I thing k I would agree. She was strong in her own way, by all accounts she didn’t want the whole husband and family thing, she was more than happy in caring for her family and doing what she wanted when she wanted and I really admire that.

“She should have been a man – a great navigator. Her powerful reason would have deduced new spheres of discovery from the knowledge of the old; and her strong imperious will would never have been daunted by opposition or difficulty, never have given way but with life. She had a head for logic, and a capability of argument unusual in a man and rarer indeed in a woman… impairing this gift was her stubborn tenacity of will which rendered her obtuse to all reasoning where her own wishes, or her own sense of right, was concerned” Quoted by Constantin Hegar

Queen Elizabeth 1

webpage_20170121_152606
Queen Elizabeth I

It may be an obvious one but I do like how strong and resilient Elizabeth was, she was an incredible woman who was living and ruling in a mans world she was under constant prejudice because of her sex and under constant pressure from her advisors telling her that she needed a husband to succeed in their world. I admire her for her stiff upper lip and fact that, yes she was a woman in a powerful position but she didn’t cave in under the pressure and she protected her people and her country when they needed her the most.

Most men in that position would have crumbled with all the back stabbing and underhand goings on that circulated the court, but not Elizabeth, she proved that a woman can survive a man’s world. All my heroines have that same courage and passion and each one of them have gone out into a mans world and made it her own, they have proved that we women don’t need knights in shining armour to ride in and save the day. . .We can save our selves.

If you want to know more about my heroines then check out the links below.

Grace Darling / Violette Szabo / Emily Bronte  / Queen Elizabeth I / Flora Sandes

The History of a Poppy

Posted on Updated on

poppies
We Will Remember Them

We all know that the Poppy is the universal symbol for respect to the fallen, it is also a sign of solidarity and hope to our brave serving man and women who risk their life’s day in day out for their country. By wearing the poppy we are telling them and the world that we are proud of them, that we are behind them and that we support them. We know why we wear our Poppy with pride on our chest, but how did that small but showy bloom come to be the symbol of such pride?

It all started during World War one and a single but powerful poem which captured the attention and imagination of a lady who swore she would always wear this bloom in respect.

field_poppy_-_papaver_rhoeas_12190335083
The Flanders Fields Poppy, The Papaver Rhoeas

During the Great War, because of the mass fighting and bombing that occurred on the western front again and again and again, the previously beautiful countryside’s were swiftly turned from lush green land to fields of mud. The landscape was bleak and barren where little if anything would grow, except a certain little red flower.

 

john_mccrae_in_uniform_circa_1914
John McCrea

On 3rd May 1915, after losing a close friend in Ypres the day before, a Canadian doctor, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrea noticed how amongst such death and destruction the simple Poppy was growing and thriving against the odd’s, this observation resulted in one of the most known and well-loved poems of all time “In Flanders Fields”. the poem was first published on 8th December 1915 in a London-based magazine called Punch.

In 1917 American professor Moina Michael was lecturing at the University of Georgia when the USA entered WWI, wanting to do something to help she took leave of her work and volunteered to assist with YMCA. On 9th November 1918, Moina, after reading John McCrea’s “In Flanders fields” she wrote a poem of her own named “We Shall Keep The Faith” in tribute and from that day she vowed to always wear a Poppy in remembrance for those that has fallen. At a YMCA conference she appeared with a silk Poppy pinned to coat and handed out 25 more to those attending she campaigned tirelessly to have the Poppy adopted as the National symbol of remembrance.

earlypoppy
The Early Poppy

It was at a conference in 1920 that the National American Legion adopted it as their official symbol of remembrance, it was at this conference a Frenchwoman, Anna E. Guerin who was inspired by what Moina had accomplished at how the Poppy had become a symbol of such importance that she made her own artificial Poppies; the poppies’ that are commonly used today.

After the war was over Moina returned to work at the University of Georgia and there she taught classes of disabled servicemen, she realized how much they needed financial and occupational support, thus she thought of the idea of selling her silk Poppies as a way to raise vital funds to assist disable veterans.
In 1921 Anna sent her Poppy Sellars to London, where the Poppy was adopted by Field Marshal Douglas Haig a founder of the Royal British Legion to be their symbol of remembrance too. The Poppy was quickly adopted by Veterans group’s in Canada, Australia and New Zealand, and it was said that all countries who adopted the remembrance Poppy were the “victors” of World War.

moina-poppy-250
Moina Michaels

From then on for the rest of Moina’s life she was always known as the “Poppy Lady”, for her hard work in various humanitarian efforts, Moina received numerous awards. She retired in 1934 and then in 1941 went on to publish her autobiography titled “The Miracle of Flower: The Story of the Flanders Fields Poppy”.

Because of a poem of loss and salvation and the act’s of two incredible women Moina and Anna, the Poppy was adopted as a symbol as remembrance. A symbol of pride and respect. By wearing our Poppy we are not only showing respect for the fallen but also to, two great women for their hard and selfless work.

***

In Flanders Fields 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

***

night-view-poppy-river-at-tower-of-london

The Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red exhibit at the Tower of London in 2014 on the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I which consists of 888,246 ceramic poppies, one for each British and colonial death.